davidhudson:

Laika.

Tags: space laika 1950s

staceythinx:

Retro microbe necklace and amoeba earrings from Lemantula Designs on Etsy

xombiedirge:

Rocket & Groot by Mike S. Miller 

(via ooksaidthelibrarian)

yuri-alekseyevich-gagarin:

Yuri Gagarin in space, 12 April 1961

(via scienceyoucanlove)


the first and the last.

the first and the last.

(Source: surecocksherlock, via sherlockbbcgraphics)

myahbailey:

Octopuses fighting unreasonable robots-  work in progress- Myah Bailey

(via tentaclespectacle)

libutron:

Tattoos of beetles

Three tattoo designs, pretty realistic and well made, illustrating three beautiful species of beetles.

Photo (and design) credit: ©tomek.litwin | [Top] - [Middle] - [Bottom] 

(via scientificillustration)

capricedubibliophile:

Art Nouveau bookbinding

1 HARAUCOURT (Edmond) L’EFFORT. La Madone. L’Antéchrist. L’Immortalité. La Fin du monde. Binding by Meunier
2 SCHWABE (Carlos). - BAUDELAIRE (Charles) LES FLEURS DU MAL. Binding by Meunier
3 SCHWOB (Marcel) LA PORTE DES REVES. Binding by Meunier
4 UZANNE (Octave) DICTIONNAIRE BIBLIOPHILOSOPHIQUE. Binding by Weckesser

Source : Le Blog du Bibliophile

(via heaveninawildflower)

zachcunningham:

Gojira
9x12”
Graphite and Charcoal
2014
I did this piece for a couple of reasons; the first of which being that I have been a hardcore Godzilla fan since my Mom put a plastic figurine of him in my crib when I was a newborn and am extremely excited for Legend’s reboot of the movie coming out this May. The second reason is that I watched the original Japanese cut of Gojira (1954) for the first time recently and was completely shocked by how different it was from the American cut that I grew up with. I never realized how much more Godzilla was than a fun and cheesy monster movie character. The reason Gojira was so terrifying, and the reason we didn’t get the original 1954 cut until a few years ago, is that the devastation caused by the giant dinosaur was a (then very relevant) metaphor for the devastation of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, and the experience of living through that catastrophe was still fresh in the minds of the filmmakers when they created it. I made this piece to remind people that all of the buildings and people that fell to Godzilla’s rampage were modeled after real death and destruction. I did this by making Godzilla a backdrop to a landscape drawing referenced directly from the rubble in Japan after the bombings.

zachcunningham:

Gojira

9x12”

Graphite and Charcoal

2014

I did this piece for a couple of reasons; the first of which being that I have been a hardcore Godzilla fan since my Mom put a plastic figurine of him in my crib when I was a newborn and am extremely excited for Legend’s reboot of the movie coming out this May. The second reason is that I watched the original Japanese cut of Gojira (1954) for the first time recently and was completely shocked by how different it was from the American cut that I grew up with. I never realized how much more Godzilla was than a fun and cheesy monster movie character. The reason Gojira was so terrifying, and the reason we didn’t get the original 1954 cut until a few years ago, is that the devastation caused by the giant dinosaur was a (then very relevant) metaphor for the devastation of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, and the experience of living through that catastrophe was still fresh in the minds of the filmmakers when they created it. I made this piece to remind people that all of the buildings and people that fell to Godzilla’s rampage were modeled after real death and destruction. I did this by making Godzilla a backdrop to a landscape drawing referenced directly from the rubble in Japan after the bombings.

smithsonianlibraries:

So I said, “If you know of any better fish puns, just let minnow!”
Historiae naturalis de quadrupetibus libri VI (1650)

smithsonianlibraries:

So I said, “If you know of any better fish puns, just let minnow!”

Historiae naturalis de quadrupetibus libri VI (1650)

fishstickmonkey:

Okimono in the Form of a Raven
Myōchin Munesuke  (Japanese, Edo period, 1688–1735)
Date: early 18th century
Culture: Japanese
Medium: Steel
Dimensions: L. 18 in. (45.7 cm)
Metropolitan Museum of Art

fishstickmonkey:

Okimono in the Form of a Raven

Myōchin Munesuke
(Japanese, Edo period, 1688–1735)

Date: early 18th century
Culture: Japanese
Medium: Steel
Dimensions: L. 18 in. (45.7 cm)

(via ooksaidthelibrarian)